Jumping on the Bandwagon

The news changes minute by minute, but some stories stick around for longer. The hype surrounding Pokemon Go, Brangelina’s break up and the move of the Great British Bake Off to Channel 4 are all recent examples of ‘light’ stories (i.e. not major catastrophes or tragedies) which have captured the public interest for longer than the average news story.

So, should a small business jump on news bandwagons to obtain a little publicity for themselves? Many do, sometimes more successfully than others, and small businesses can too, providing they take consideration of the following three ‘rules’ for success:

  1. It must be quick: to jump on a bandwagon effectively, your leap must be almost immediate. Leave it more than 24-36 hours and you will have missed the boat, and then risk looking foolish and making comment on something that others have already lost interest in.
  1. It must be light-hearted – nobody likes to see a cruel advert or comment about a news story, and a little wit goes a long way for encouraging engagement, especially on social media.
  1. It must be relevant – your business should have a link to the news story you are commenting on to give your publicity context and make sense to the viewer. Without it, you may risk appearing as though you are simply using the news for publicity’s sake, which could turn potential and existing customers off. The key here is to keep your message simple, so that the relevance isn’t lost to the viewer.

A good example of all three of these points working well for publicity is Norwegian Air Shuttle ASA’s recent “Brad is Single” advert in a newspaper, promoting cheap flights to Los Angeles in reference to Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie’s recent marriage break up. Simple, relevant, timely (it appeared soon after the separation was announced) and light-hearted, I have seen it shared several times on social media already, maximising its audience to those who may not usually consider Norwegian for flights and promoting its services in a positive manner.

For small businesses, this style of marketing is probably best achieved via social media or email marketing due to its immediacy in reaching the intended audience. Providing the three rules above are followed, there is no reason why small businesses cannot make use of news stories to give them an angle for short-term marketing and can help to make a marketing message memorable. So go ahead and jump on that bandwagon!

Advertisements

Social Media for a Small Business – Help! Where Do I Start?

Facebook. Twitter. LinkedIn. Pinterest. Instagram. Vine. Tinder. Tumblr. YouTube. Flickr. Google+. Vimeo. Foursquare. MySpace.

social_media_logos

Ok, maybe not MySpace anymore. However, this list of the first few social media platforms that came to my mind shows just how many platforms currently are available for businesses to try. Does that mean you should have a presence on all of them?

Of course not – for a small business, it just wouldn’t be possible. Don’t forget that whilst many of these platforms are free to use, your time isn’t – and that is where the cost of social media can often be seen.

So which one (or more) should you choose? The first step is to look at who is using the platforms – is your intended audience there? For example, users of Vine (a sharing platform for 6-second videos) tend to be younger so it would be pointless setting up on there if your audience are ‘silver surfers’ (broadly speaking, of course).

This analysis will form the first part of a social media plan for your business. Having a plan is essential to make sure that you know where you want to be, what you want to say and how you intend to say it online – especially if a third party (such as a staff member or external consultant) will be posting online on behalf of your business. Give that person a clear brief, as mistakes can lead to potentially costly repercussions for your business reputation.

It is fine to use only one platform. It is also fine to use several. The key is making sure that you have appealing and appropriate content to share with those who engage with your business on your chosen platform(s). Without this, you will struggle to reach or interest followers, which will see your business drown in the noise of today’s social media.

When does publicity become bad publicity, and what can you do to stop it?

On Sunday, my local local newspaper ran a little feature poking fun at the wording in a job vacancy. It was harmless, but it got me thinking about the old adage “there’s no such thing as bad publicity“.

Now that we live in a world where everyone has a voice to discuss issues and experiences, is all publicity good for our businesses or is bad publicity exactly that, harmful to our brand and image?

If your business receives a bad review online or on social media, it is recommended that the best way to deal with it is to respond quickly to lessen it’s overall impact. We don’t just shrug our shoulders and say “at least they’re talking about us”. This suggests that views on publicity have changed – we now all are actively seeking positive promotion from those around us.

So what can you do if your company receives bad publicity?

1. Take expert advice. Don’t make the situation worse by handling it badly.

2. Respond straight away, if not directly then at least by taking advice. Don’t ignore it and hope it will go away.

3. Don’t badmouth the person or outlet (i.e. a newspaper or similar) who has given the bad publicity.  It will only make you look petty.

4. Don’t keep a low profile and hope the situation will blow over. Counteract the bad publicity by generating some good profile – publicise a charitable act or demonstrate where you’ve made positive changes in the business.

Unfortunately,  every news story or social media comment now lasts forever as an online footprint. So make sure you put best practices in place from the outset across your marketing and customer care strategies, and hopefully you will be at less risk of bad publicity for your business.